Posts Tagged: The Ecstatic Flash

Blues For Baltinache

A landscape of salt and water: In Baltinache the clay and salt curdled Earth that surrounds a succession of six lagoons resemble miniature tectonic plates, cracked and fitting into each other in enzyme-substrate formation like nature’s own puzzle…

Blues For Baltinache

A landscape of salt and water: In Baltinache the clay and salt curdled Earth that surrounds a succession of six lagoons resemble miniature tectonic plates, cracked and fitting into each other in enzyme-substrate formation like nature’s own puzzle…

Fukinsei: Behind Wabi-Sabi

A few weeks ago, I shared some thoughts on the Japanese aesthetic concept of Wabi-Sabi and how re-calibrating my perspective to practice Wabi-Sabi an ideal for living has not only brought more beauty into my life, but been essential to my survival. Now, producer Josh Gwynn and I share with you behind the scenes action from that shoot. The short film, Fukinsei, is a non-linear irregularity; an experiment in story telling both visual and narrative.What better way to share the tenets of an aesthetic concept that aspires to asymmetry and imperfection than by making a piece that is itself, well, quite Wabi-Sabi.

Fukinsei: Behind Wabi-Sabi

A few weeks ago, I shared some thoughts on the Japanese aesthetic concept of Wabi-Sabi and how re-calibrating my perspective to practice Wabi-Sabi an ideal for living has not only brought more beauty into my life, but been essential to my survival. Now, producer Josh Gwynn and I share with you behind the scenes action from that shoot. The short film, Fukinsei, is a non-linear irregularity; an experiment in story telling both visual and narrative.What better way to share the tenets of an aesthetic concept that aspires to asymmetry and imperfection than by making a piece that is itself, well, quite Wabi-Sabi.

Life Art Thirty

“Step onto the lustrous black and pearlescent white marble of Mandarin Oriental’s lobby, and instead of a flurry of guests waiting to check-in, a painting will seize your attention. Its hues of fuscia and lapis are set in staccato brushstrokes against

Life Art Thirty

“Step onto the lustrous black and pearlescent white marble of Mandarin Oriental’s lobby, and instead of a flurry of guests waiting to check-in, a painting will seize your attention. Its hues of fuscia and lapis are set in staccato brushstrokes against

/ Food

Tea With A Twist

For our Christmas tea with a twist, I served a spearmint incarnation of a delicate green tea burst with notes of passion fruit that I discovered in an unassuming little tea shop in Le Marais. Thrilled to finally put my Moroccan tea set to use, I imagined the choice was apropos because Jesus was middle eastern wasn’t he?

/ Food

Tea With A Twist

For our Christmas tea with a twist, I served a spearmint incarnation of a delicate green tea burst with notes of passion fruit that I discovered in an unassuming little tea shop in Le Marais. Thrilled to finally put my Moroccan tea set to use, I imagined the choice was apropos because Jesus was middle eastern wasn’t he?

One Name, One Dream: Painter Alvaro In His Own Words

“I knew it!” he bellowed. “I said to myself, look for Naomi, look for Naomi and there you are! I knew you would be fabulous!” These were the first words Brooklyn-born, Bronx-raised artist of Puerto-Rican and Spanish descent, Alvaro uttered to me when we met on the stairs on the First Baptist Church in the City of New York over a year ago. Alvaro—like Madonna and Rihanna, mononymously known for his craft— darted up the stairs, toward the bright red church doors against which I was leaning and gave me a warm and deep hug, the varietal of hug exchanged by old friends, and not people who were meeting for the first time ever for the purposes of an interview…

One Name, One Dream: Painter Alvaro In His Own Words

“I knew it!” he bellowed. “I said to myself, look for Naomi, look for Naomi and there you are! I knew you would be fabulous!” These were the first words Brooklyn-born, Bronx-raised artist of Puerto-Rican and Spanish descent, Alvaro uttered to me when we met on the stairs on the First Baptist Church in the City of New York over a year ago. Alvaro—like Madonna and Rihanna, mononymously known for his craft— darted up the stairs, toward the bright red church doors against which I was leaning and gave me a warm and deep hug, the varietal of hug exchanged by old friends, and not people who were meeting for the first time ever for the purposes of an interview…

Written in the Black Stars…

But wait – it wasn’t. There was confusion on the field. What happened? It took what felt like minutes before I realized that Luis Suarez, one of the most promising Uruguayan strikers, had deliberately reached into the air, plucked the destiny of Africa out of the sky and thrown it out of the goal. The infraction was seen by the referee, half the world and all over Africa, the sound of a shattered dream reverberated. Red card. Suarez sent off in tears.

Written in the Black Stars…

But wait – it wasn’t. There was confusion on the field. What happened? It took what felt like minutes before I realized that Luis Suarez, one of the most promising Uruguayan strikers, had deliberately reached into the air, plucked the destiny of Africa out of the sky and thrown it out of the goal. The infraction was seen by the referee, half the world and all over Africa, the sound of a shattered dream reverberated. Red card. Suarez sent off in tears.